Elections Information

Elections.jpg

Local Elections Voting is from 20 Sept 2019 to 12 Oct 2019

Get yourself and your communities election ready.

Here are some helpful information around the governance, the election process and how to get involved.

Who can vote in local elections

For more information visit: https://vote.nz/

  • If you own property within a local council area outside where you usually live, apply to go on the ratepayer roll so you can vote for area you have property in and area you actually live in.

  • If you are registered on the unpublished roll, you will need to apply to the electoral officer at your local council to receive your voting papers.

  • Overseas voters can take part, but must ensure that they are correctly enrolled with an overseas postal address in order to receive their voting papers. Voting papers for local elections cannot be downloaded.

Ways to vote

Images ele.jpg

WHAT YOU ARE VOTING FOR

Images ele - Copy.jpg

How voting works

TYPES.jpg

FIND OUT ABOUT WHAT YOU’RE VOTING FOR AND THE CANDIDATES IN YOUR AREA

A great resource by The Spinoff where you enter your address details and it let’s you know what things you need to vote on, who the candidates are and also what their policies are - what they stand for. Try it today!

Difference between Auckland Council and Local Boards

Local government is the means by which communities make democratic decisions about the way in which their towns, cities and regions work and how they will develop.

Local government is the means by which communities make democratic decisions about the way in which their towns, cities and regions work and how they will develop.

Councils play a broad range of local roles, from services undertaken on behalf of the community itself, to most regulatory services undertaken on behalf of central government.

Regional councils play a core role in the management of natural resources of an area. This includes:

• biosecurity control (including pest control and noxious plants);

• resource management (quality of water, soil, coastal planning);

• flood and river management;

• public transport;

• civil defence (natural disasters, marine oil spill); and

• regional transport planning and passenger transport services.

Functions may vary from place to place as activities can be transferred between territorial and regional councils and many councils have established joint service delivery arrangements.

Cities and districts have the widest range of responsibilities, which include:

• infrastructure services, such as waste water, storm water and drinking water (councils own assets worth more than $120 billion);

• local roads (councils own 87 per cent of all roads);

• town planning and resource management;

• local regulatory services, such as building consenting, dog control and liquor licensing (councils undertake more than 30 separate regulatory functions);

• parks and recreation and cultural facilities;

• libraries and museums;

• cemeteries;

• community amenities;

• economic development (councils spend more than $250 million per annum on economic development);

• tourist promotion; and

• local and regional leadership and advocacy.